international antique market – Art Lini http://artlini.net/ Tue, 08 Jun 2021 06:52:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://artlini.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png international antique market – Art Lini http://artlini.net/ 32 32 NJ to expand prescription drug programs to over 20,000 older people https://artlini.net/nj-to-expand-prescription-drug-programs-to-over-20000-older-people/ Mon, 07 Jun 2021 23:10:26 +0000 https://artlini.net/nj-to-expand-prescription-drug-programs-to-over-20000-older-people/

TRENTON – State lawmakers have started the process of expanding New Jersey’s prescription drug programs to more than 20,000 additional seniors, as Gov. Phil Murphy suggested in his 2022 budget plan .

Under the proposal, the income limits for Pharmaceutical Assistance for the Elderly and Disabled and Senior Gold would increase by $ 10,000. They would be $ 38,769 for a single person and $ 45,270 for a married couple in PAAD, with those $ 10,000 thresholds higher under Senior Gold.

MP Valerie Vainieri Huttle, D-Bergen, said the cost of prescriptions can be so sky-high that some seniors split their medications in half to make them last longer, even if doing so makes them less effective.

“I think we can all agree that the cost of prescription drugs is obviously a challenge for a lot of us – and obviously for our seniors,” said Vainieri Huttle.

The bill was approved last week by the Assembly’s Committee on Aging and Seniors’ Services, and is now awaiting a second approval by the Assembly’s Budget Committee. The Senate Health and Seniors Committee plans to review the plan at its meeting on Thursday.

Katie York, deputy state director of advocacy for AARP New Jersey, said the average Medicare Part D registrant takes four to five prescription drugs per month, with some facing out-of-pocket costs of $ 10,000 per year.

“Too many Garden State residents are forced to choose between life-saving drugs and paying rent, buying food and meeting other basic needs,” York said.

“In 2017, nearly one in four New Jerseyes quit taking prescription drugs because of the cost, and we know things haven’t gotten any easier since,” she said.

Cathy Rowe, executive director of New Jersey Advocates for Aging Well, said the expansion would include upfront costs – estimated at nearly $ 7 million in PAAD, which is about 95% of the expected increase – but would generate additional costs. long-term savings.

“We expect better health, reduced medical interventions, reduced disability, and reduced hospitalizations and emergency room visits,” Rowe said.

Rowe said many older residents are caught in the middle when it comes to health care costs such as prescriptions and that will become increasingly important and complicated as more drugs are approved to treat conditions. , thus improving the quality and quantity of life.

“Their income is too high to qualify for Medicaid or other programs, but they don’t have the resources to live comfortably while supporting their medical needs,” Rowe said.

Michael Symons is the State House bureau chief for New Jersey 101.5. Contact him at michael.symons@townsquaremedia.com.

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Do you remember the glassblower who was at Hampton Beach? https://artlini.net/do-you-remember-the-glassblower-who-was-at-hampton-beach/ Mon, 07 Jun 2021 17:53:32 +0000 https://artlini.net/do-you-remember-the-glassblower-who-was-at-hampton-beach/

Hampton Beach had a glassblower

On the The Hampton Beach Friends Facebook page, there was an article someone did about a glassblower that people could watch making their art a long time ago on the boulevard in Hampton Beach. I remember seeing him as a child. Turns out his name was Pat Dee, according to journals.com.

The artist created beautiful sculptures

I remember watching this guy for hours creating intricate works of art with glass. According to the newspaper article, Pat said he had to learn to paint with glass. If the glass cools too much it becomes impossible to work with, so he had to know exactly where he was going with each piece he placed.

The artist learned his trade as an apprentice

When Pat was 14, he learned his trade from a glassblower who had no sons to pass on his trade to.

Pat trained his nephew what he knew

The article goes on to say that Pat had two daughters who weren’t interested in glassblowing, so he taught his nephew Randy Bouchard from Newburyport. When I looked at Randy I ran into an obituary that can be his, although I cannot confirm it.

The shop was in Hampton for decades

The newspaper article was dated May 4, 1974 and in the article it says that Pat has owned the store for 21 years, so since 1953? Pat said he was on NBC’s calling list. Whenever they needed a glassblower, they called him. He claimed in the article that he was also on Steve Allen’s former show Tonight!

Glassblowing is really cool to watch

This video shows highly skilled glassblowers creating some truly amazing sculptures. Check it out:

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Clifton Shaw elected mayor of Slaton in Saturday’s run-off election https://artlini.net/clifton-shaw-elected-mayor-of-slaton-in-saturdays-run-off-election/ Sun, 06 Jun 2021 05:54:00 +0000 https://artlini.net/clifton-shaw-elected-mayor-of-slaton-in-saturdays-run-off-election/

On Saturday, two second-round elections were held in Slaton. The first was for the mayor of Slaton and the second for the special election, the town commissioner of Slaton, Ward 4.

The citizens of Slaton elected Clifton “Clif” Shaw as their new mayor. Shaw defeated John Gatica was previously a mayoral candidate at the end of 2019 to fill an unexpired term.

Shaw’s supporters particularly supported him in the early poll, where he held a 66.36% advantage over Gatica’s 33.64%. After all the votes were tallied on Saturday, Shaw finished with 61.92% of the vote (426 votes) and Gatica garnered 38.08% of the vote (262 votes).

During the special election of the commissioner of the city of Slaton, district 4, this second round must fulfill an unexpired mandate. Valarie Cubit defeated Frankie Cisneros by a total of 6 votes, 65-59. Cubit’s turnout on election day sealed the victory, with Cubit winning 26 votes on election day, compared to 18 for Cisneros.

Slaton’s ongoing transition with their municipal government will not end with the swearing-in of a new mayor later this month.

At present, the town of Slaton has a job posting on their website for the city administrator, with a note on the first round of interviews which will take place around June 21.

The Town of Slaton will accept nominations for the position of municipal administrator. The City is looking for a highly qualified and motivated person for the position.

Anyone interested should email mlamberson@cityofslaton.com or call (806-828-2000) to speak to Mike Lamberson and receive a copy of the job requirements for this position. The Town of Slaton is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Hiring decisions are based solely on the qualifications, merits and needs of the City. The first round of interviews will take place on or around June 21, 2021.

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Editorial – Looking for a recovery: Tourism businesses optimistic about an increase this season | Editorials https://artlini.net/editorial-looking-for-a-recovery-tourism-businesses-optimistic-about-an-increase-this-season-editorials/ Sun, 06 Jun 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://artlini.net/editorial-looking-for-a-recovery-tourism-businesses-optimistic-about-an-increase-this-season-editorials/

For some tourism-related companies, 2020 will not be a highlight in their history.

The novel coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the operations of many businesses in upstate New York. Necessary security protocols forced many people to stay in their homes over the past year rather than visiting popular sites.

In addition, cross-border traffic between Canada and the United States was closed to most people. Canadian tourists represent a large portion of the hospitality market in the north of the country.

But representatives of local tourism companies believe they have good reason to be optimistic. They are seeing signs that the industry will be doing well this year.

“People who run hotels, destinations and tourist attractions, and local chambers of commerce believe the tourism industry will rebound after a disastrous season last year when the state barred it from opening for two months due to the pandemic, ”the article reported. “Although he was reluctant to use the word ‘rebound’ to predict the season, Corey Fram, director of the 1000 Islands International Tourism Council, said all indications were that people would be back in the north of the country to move from time in river and lake communities., enjoy the outdoors and visit attractions such as Boldt Castle and the Ancient Ship Museum. He has already heard positive anecdotal things about hotel occupancy rates. Outdoor recreation shows a 200% increase over last year State parks in the region surpass all other parts of the state.

This is proof that hotel and tourism businesses will fare better this year. Coronavirus infection rates have declined and many people have been vaccinated against COVID-19. This has resulted in a relaxation of some security mandates, which provides increased freedom to engage in various activities.

However, strict restrictions at the Canadian border remain in place. It is not known when these rules will be revised and how this will affect tourism.

“At this point, no one knows when the Canadian market will open. It depends on the sufficient number of Canadians who receive the COVID-19 vaccine, [Fram] said, ”according to the Times story. “Last year, attendance at Singer Castle declined by 9,000 visitors, from about 23,000 in 2019 to 14,000 in 2020. Much of the decline came from Canadian tourists who could not cross the river. border, whether by car, charter boat or on their own. ships, said Jean Papke, deputy general manager of the attraction. While Canadians may not be back in the north this year, Kelly Layman, concierge at 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel in Clayton, said the hospitality industry can only count on visitors to the state. last year due to out-of-state travel restrictions. This situation has changed, she said. Out-of-state trips are open again and the Harbor Hotel continues to offer romantic weekends and other promotions, she said.

We can all contribute to efforts to boost the local economy. Anyone eligible should be vaccinated and continue to observe prudent health measures if necessary. This will further reduce the risk of ongoing infection, thus allowing greater freedom of activity.

And we should take advantage of opportunities when possible. Many people depend on the tourism, hospitality and event planning industries for their livelihoods – they make our region strong. Let’s show them the support they deserve and make 2021 a season to remember.

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Bridging the Ivory Gap to Save Africa’s Largest Mammal https://artlini.net/bridging-the-ivory-gap-to-save-africas-largest-mammal/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 14:14:25 +0000 https://artlini.net/bridging-the-ivory-gap-to-save-africas-largest-mammal/

Paul Tullis

Since the 2000s, an elephant poaching epidemic has raged across Africa, with populations decimated in some areas and multiple species increasingly at risk of being wiped out by the ivory thirst of the country. humanity.

Currently at around $ 3,300 (roughly Rand 46,000) a pound, the global ivory trade is worth around $ 23 billion a year, a reality illustrated by the gruesome photos of slaughtered elephants that have become almost commonplace. In recent years, massive ivory seizures seemed to signal a headlong rush towards extermination.

In response, the EU this year proposed an almost total ban on ivory trade anywhere in the bloc. In combination with existing restrictions in China and the United States, the proposed rules could help build momentum towards a global crackdown, shifting the focus to Southeast Asia, where much of the remaining trade is is moved.

A theory has developed among wildlife experts, one believing that large seizures are not signs of disaster, but that tighter global controls are working. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime noted in its annual report on wildlife crime that recent seizures could mean investors are liquidating their stocks believing that, thanks to trade bans, prices are rising. decline for good.

However, conservationists fear that the recent increase in elephant killings may not be a last breath of poachers, but rather the latest chapter of an iconic mammal that will soon cease to exist.

For millennia, skilled artisans across Africa, Europe and Asia have carved elephant tusks into intricate works of art. Indeed, humanity’s fascination with luminous and porous material has long been the bane of elephants’ existence. Even the limited human populations of ancient Greece and Egypt generated enough demand to wipe out elephant populations in North Africa and the Middle East. European settlers from Africa went further, accelerating the march towards extinction by slaughtering elephants for religious icons, billiard balls, furniture inlays, musical instruments and sword handles.

In modern times, smuggling efforts have benefited from official corruption and underfunded enforcement in countries like Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania, according to John Sellar, former head of Convention enforcement. International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and now affiliated with Transparency International.

The modern method of slaughtering elephants is shockingly inhuman: poachers use cyanide and poisoned arrows or spears, incapacitating elephants and causing slow and excruciating deaths. Tusks are often cut into the mammal’s skull while it is still alive. Guns are sometimes used, but the gunfire attracts the attention of park rangers, who poachers also kill on a regular basis. Hundreds of rangers have been murdered since the International Federation of Rangers began to count in 2000.

In total, the 3 million or more elephants that roamed the Earth in the 19th century are just over 400,000 today. In some places, the population has been reduced by two-thirds in less than a decade. Both species of African elephant, forest and savanna, are either endangered or critically endangered. One of the three Asian species is threatened. And while habitat loss due to growing human populations and agriculture is an important factor, the vast majority of elephant deaths are attributed to poaching.

In 2016, the US government sought to institute a near-total ban on the ivory trade. The following year, China also made efforts to close its markets. Advocates saw an opportunity in the fight to protect the world’s largest land mammals – by removing the financial incentive for poachers. As the illegal ivory trade continued, the effort of both countries was seen as progress. “Polls have shown that far fewer people are willing to buy ivory due to the ban in China,” said Daniela Freyer, co-founder of the German nonprofit conservation association Pro Wildlife.

But there remains a major loophole, the elimination of which would be a major step towards slowing the eradication of elephants. In many countries, a distinction is still made between older ivory obtained long ago, which can be sold, and newer ivory from recent elephant killings, which cannot. This has been a controversial aspect of European rules, and emblematic of what environmentalists argue is the failure of half measures.

The EU has vehemently criticized laxity in enforcing the ivory trade in Asia while allowing it to continue in its own backyard. African ivory imported into EU countries before 1990, Asian ivory before 1975 and all ivory acquired before 1947 can be legally sold within the EU. Meanwhile, ivory dating from before the mid-1970s can be exported from the block.

While such rules appear to restrict trade in more recently harvested ivory, in reality they do not, said Sabri Zain, policy director of TRAFFIC, a UK nonprofit working to end the unsustainable trade in natural products. This is because there is no easy way to determine the actual age of the ivory. The legal framework, he said, “allows traders to bring fresh ivory into the EU market”.

Carved elephant tusk dealers “are really good at making ivory look antique,” said Sam Wasser, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the University of Washington. “They know what they are selling – this is all a sham.”

At the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, Kateřina Pachnerová Brabcová and her colleagues used carbon-14 dating to determine the age of ivory that an alleged trader, caught in a 2016 bust, passed off as an antique . The suspect presented a statement from a recorded expert witness who claimed that the coins were old enough to be marketed legally in Europe. Such statements, the researchers said, were commonly used in the ivory trade to show that the items were free from restrictions.

It turned out that the expert was wrong and that the suspect’s ivory was much younger than claimed. Indeed, some 68% of Brabcová’s “old ivory” samples were younger than 1947, and the “experts” determination was incorrect 86% of the time, according to the researchers, who published their findings in the forensic journal. Crime, Law, and Social Change.

The only real solution, argue conservationists, is to ban the ivory trade everywhere.

The EU seems to have moved towards this prospect. The European Commission’s proposal presented in January would fill important loopholes in the block’s ivory trade restrictions, leaving little room for repairing old musical instruments incorporating ivory. France, Belgium and the Netherlands already have strong national bans in place, as does the UK.

Yet scientists and activists believe that a change in EU law will not be enough to slow the race to elephant extinction.

On March 24, the Elephant Trade Information System revealed an increase in the amount of ivory seized by law enforcement in recent years, including the three largest seizures on record. Tusks of thousands of dead elephants totaling over 25,000 kg have been intercepted in China, Singapore and Vietnam.

This gave credence to a 2020 article in Scientific Reports that, with the exception of East Africa, seizures were increasing. About 15 years ago, more elephants were killed in Kenya and Tanzania, according to the report. But as these countries intensified anti-poaching patrols and the fight against smuggling, criminal syndicates shifted their activities to other regions, such as central and southern Africa.

Singapore’s bust in 2019 is consistent with those findings, said Wasser, who uses DNA testing to determine the ivory’s point of origin. His lab’s work shows that the Singapore ivory came from the Kavango Zambezi Transboundary Conservation Area, a protected area that spans portions of five southern African countries: Angola, Botswana, Namibia. , Zambia and Zimbabwe.

More than half of the remaining African elephants live in the region. Wasser said that “the majority of the foreclosures we have analyzed over the past few years” have come from there. For his part, Wasser remains skeptical of the UN claim that these large busts are a sign that the ivory grabbers are withdrawing from the trade.

Singapore ivory, he said, “didn’t look old.” – Bloomberg


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We are cracking down on the ivory trade, but is it too late for the elephants? https://artlini.net/we-are-cracking-down-on-the-ivory-trade-but-is-it-too-late-for-the-elephants/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 23:01:00 +0000 https://artlini.net/we-are-cracking-down-on-the-ivory-trade-but-is-it-too-late-for-the-elephants/

Ssince the 2000s, an elephant poaching epidemic has raged across Africa, with populations decimated in some areas and multiple species increasingly at risk of being wiped out by the ivory thirst of the country. humanity.

Currently at around $ 3,300 a pound, the global ivory trade is worth around $ 23 billion a year, a reality evidenced by the gruesome photos of slaughtered elephants that have become almost commonplace. In recent years, massive ivory seizures seemed to signal a headlong rush towards extermination.

In response, the European Union this year proposed an almost total ban on ivory trade throughout the bloc. In combination with the existing restrictions in China and the United States, the proposed rules could help create momentum towards a global crackdown, shifting the focus to Southeast Asia, where much of the remaining trade s’ is moved.

A theory has developed among wildlife experts, one believing that large seizures are not signs of disaster, but that tighter global controls are working. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime noted in its annual report on wildlife crime that recent seizures could mean investors are liquidating their stocks believing that, thanks to trade bans, prices are rising. decline for good.

However, conservationists fear that the recent increase in elephant killings may not be a last breath of poachers, but rather the latest chapter of an iconic mammal that will soon cease to exist.



The modern method of killing elephants is shockingly inhuman: poachers use cyanide and poisoned arrows or spears, incapacitating elephants and causing slow and excruciating deaths

For millennia, skilled artisans across Africa, Europe and Asia have carved elephant tusks into intricate works of art. Indeed, humanity’s fascination with luminous and porous material has long been the bane of elephants’ existence. Even the limited human populations of ancient Greece and Egypt generated enough demand to wipe out elephant populations in North Africa and the Middle East. European settlers from Africa went further, accelerating the march towards extinction by slaughtering elephants for religious icons, billiard balls, furniture inlays, musical instruments and sword handles.

In modern times, smuggling efforts have benefited from official corruption and underfunded enforcement in countries like Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania, according to John Sellar, former head of Convention enforcement. International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and now affiliated with Transparency International.

The modern method of slaughtering elephants is shockingly inhuman: poachers use cyanide and poisoned arrows or spears, incapacitating elephants and causing slow and excruciating deaths. Tusks are often cut into the mammal’s skull while it is still alive. Guns are sometimes used, but the gunfire attracts the attention of park rangers, who poachers also kill on a regular basis. Hundreds of rangers have been murdered since the International Federation of Rangers began to count in 2000.

In total, the 3 million or more elephants that roamed the Earth in the 19th century are just over 400,000 today. In some places, the population has been reduced by two-thirds in less than a decade. Both species of African elephant, forest and savanna, are either endangered or critically endangered. One of the three Asian species is threatened. And while habitat loss due to growing human populations and agriculture is an important factor, the vast majority of elephant deaths are attributed to poaching.

In 2016, the US government sought to institute a near-total ban on the ivory trade. The following year, China also made efforts to close its markets. Advocates saw an opportunity in the fight to protect the world’s largest land mammals, removing the financial incentive for poachers. As the illegal ivory trade continued, the effort of both countries was seen as progress. “Polls have shown that far fewer people are willing to buy ivory due to the ban in China,” said Daniela Freyer, co-founder of the German nonprofit conservation association Pro Wildlife.

(Getty Images / iStockphoto)

But there remains a major loophole, the elimination of which would be a major step towards slowing the eradication of elephants. In many countries, a distinction is still made between older ivory obtained long ago, which can be sold, and newer ivory from recent elephant killings, which cannot. This has been a controversial aspect of European rules, and emblematic of what environmentalists argue is the failure of half measures.

The EU has vehemently criticized laxity in enforcing the ivory trade in Asia while allowing it to continue in its own backyard. African ivory imported into EU countries before 1990, Asian ivory before 1975 and all ivory acquired before 1947 can be legally sold within the EU. Meanwhile, ivory dating from before the mid-1970s can be exported from the block.

While such rules seem to restrict the trade in more recently harvested ivory, in reality they don’t, says Sabri Zain, policy director of Traffic, a UK non-profit that works to end unsustainable trade in natural products. This is because there is no easy way to determine the actual age of the ivory. The legal framework, he says, “allows traders to bring fresh ivory into the EU market.”

Traders of carved elephant tusks “are really good at making ivory look antique,” says Sam Wasser, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the University of Washington. “They know what they are selling – this is all a sham.”



Tusks of thousands of dead elephants totaling over 25,000 kilograms have been intercepted in China, Singapore and Vietnam

At the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, Katerina Pachnerova Brabcova and her colleagues used carbon-14 dating to determine the age of ivory that an alleged trader, caught in a 2016 bust, passed off as an object antique. The suspect presented a statement from a recorded expert witness who claimed that the coins were old enough to be marketed legally in Europe. Such statements, say the researchers, are commonly used in the ivory trade to show that the items are free from restrictions.

It turned out that the expert was wrong and that the suspect’s ivory was much younger than claimed. Indeed, about 68 percent of Brabcova’s “old ivory” samples were younger than 1947, and the “expert” determination was incorrect 86 percent of the time, according to the researchers, who published their findings in the journal Medico. -Legal Crime, Law and Social Change.

The only real solution, argue conservationists, is to ban the ivory trade everywhere.

The EU seems to have moved towards this prospect. The European Commission proposal presented in January would close important loopholes in the block’s ivory trade restrictions, leaving little room for repairing old musical instruments that incorporate ivory. France, Belgium and the Netherlands already have strong national bans in place, as does the UK.

(Getty Images / iStockphoto)

Yet scientists and activists believe that a change in EU law will not be enough to slow the race to elephant extinction.

On March 24, the Elephant Trade Information System revealed an increase in the amount of ivory seized by law enforcement in recent years, including the three largest seizures on record. Tusks of thousands of dead elephants totaling over 25,000 kilograms have been intercepted in China, Singapore and Vietnam.

This gave credence to a 2020 article in Scientific Reports that, with the exception of East Africa, seizures were increasing. About 15 years ago, more elephants were killed in Kenya and Tanzania, according to the report. But as these countries intensified anti-poaching patrols and the fight against smuggling, criminal syndicates shifted their activities to other regions, such as central and southern Africa.

Singapore’s bust in 2019 is consistent with those findings, says Wasser, who uses DNA testing to determine the ivory’s point of origin. His lab’s work shows that the Singapore ivory came from the Kavango Zambezi Transboundary Conservation Area, a protected area that spans portions of five southern African countries: Angola, Botswana, Namibia. , Zambia and Zimbabwe.

More than half of the remaining African elephants live in the region. Wasser says that “the majority of the crises that we have analyzed in recent years” come from there. For his part, Wasser remains skeptical of the UN claim that these large busts are a sign that the ivory grabbers are withdrawing from the trade.

Singapore ivory, he says, “didn’t look old.”

© The Washington Post


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Assistance Available for Hudson Valley Tenants Affected by COVID https://artlini.net/assistance-available-for-hudson-valley-tenants-affected-by-covid/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 09:27:18 +0000 https://artlini.net/assistance-available-for-hudson-valley-tenants-affected-by-covid/

Help from New York State’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program, ERAP, is available to residents of Dutchess County who are struggling to pay their rent or utilities due to COVID-19 .

Low and moderate income residents who are struggling to pay their rent or utilities are encouraged by the Dutchess County Department of Community and Family Services (DCFS) to apply for assistance through the PIU.

In a DCFS press release on Thursday, June 3, Commissioner Sabrina Jaar-Marzouka explained:

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected many of our most vulnerable residents, but help remains available to help residents in need stay in their homes. We urge those seeking assistance to take advantage of all available options to consolidate their housing stability.

Program assistance can include up to 12 months of past due rent, and for some, up to three months of future rent, as well as up to 12 months of past due electricity or gas bills. In order to be eligible for ERAP assistance, residents of Dutchess County must meet the following criteria:

  • Gross household income equal to or less than 80% of median income in the region, which varies by county and household size
  • A household member received unemployment benefits or suffered a reduction in income, incurred significant costs, or experienced financial hardship, directly or indirectly, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • The applicant owes rent in arrears at their current residence.

Payments subsidized by the ERAP will always be issued directly to the owner or utility provider.

Program applications can be submitted directly using this link, and additional details on the New York State Emergency Rental Assistance Program are available at Dutchess County Department of Community and Family Services website, or by phone at (844) 691-7368.

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Cuomo and state lawmakers agree on many new rules for New York state

New York lawmakers have passed a $ 212 billion budget that includes nearly $ 4 billion in new taxes, legal sports betting, record-breaking school aid and more.

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Vacant buildings on Route 37 in Toms River, New Jersey https://artlini.net/vacant-buildings-on-route-37-in-toms-river-new-jersey/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 07:00:49 +0000 https://artlini.net/vacant-buildings-on-route-37-in-toms-river-new-jersey/

Our last real estate question concerns this former 7-11 on Route 37 in Toms River. This site is currently dark and has been closed for a while. It is a busy section of Route 37 near Lakehurst Road. Recently we have seen several 7-11s close in Ocean County.

We usually throw the question “what’s next?” And it’s the same with this place. Whether the existing building is used, whether the old 7-11 or 7-11 is demolished and a new building is constructed… what do you think is the best idea for this location? So many vacant lots and buildings here in Ocean County, we have to start rebuilding these areas… a little sitting park would be better than an old, decaying vacant building, okay?

Listen to Shawn Michaels’ Mornings on 92.7 WOBM and download our free 92.7 WOBM app.

The funny thing about this place is that it was a place I used to go as a kid with my friends to get treats at 7-11. Summer was always a walk until 7-11 with our change (money) to grab a slurpee and maybe a few pennies of candy. I remember the bazooka chewing gum was a favorite. Every once in a while when we went on our 7-11 trip we would get baseball cards and then sit outside on the sidewalk and “flip” our cards. Childhood sports game lol and sometimes you won and sometimes you lost all of your baseball cards lol. Another thing we loved about 7-11 was “wacky packages”Always fun to collect stickers.

Sad to see the old dark and vacant hangout, it’s been a while… guess I haven’t noticed it recently. Now I want a slurpee lol

Post your comments below

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Four charming villages in the Luberon in France https://artlini.net/four-charming-villages-in-the-luberon-in-france/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 13:55:41 +0000 https://artlini.net/four-charming-villages-in-the-luberon-in-france/

the Luberon, located in the southern part of Provence, France, is filled with small villages that define the charm and beauty of the beloved region. Most are of medieval origin with ancient stone buildings and monuments still intact – and some date back to Roman times in the 3rd and 4th centuries. Town squares where food and flea markets reign; plane trees, olive trees and fig trees line the streets; clusters of ivy climbing the walls of sunny buildings; and the outdoor cafes where you can enjoy espresso and pastis are just some of the features that make these villages so irresistible.

We visited several villages during a weeklong stay in the Luberon last summer and here are four of our favorites.

Lourmarin

Lourmarin Castle, originally a 14th century fortress, is the entry point to Lourmarin. The beautiful castle belonged for the last time to the historian and cosmetics magnate Robert Laurent Vibert, who bought it in 1920, luckily saving it from demolition. He then restores the castle in depth, filling it with a treasure of furniture, paintings, engravings, works of art and musical instruments from the 16th to the 19th century. Today it is a museum that exhibits many objects from the owner’s collection. In addition to temporary exhibitions of art and photography, the castle sponsors in summer a festival of classical music for young musicians, which takes place on the open-air grounds.

The famous Friday food and flea market attracts people from all over the region and the large market covers much of the village. Local vendors sell the freshest produce and regional artisan foods, such as local olives and olive tapenade, jams and jellies, and Provence herbs in burlap bags; in summer, bouquets and sachets of the mythical lavender of Provence, honey, wine, bread and pastries, dry sausage. If you want to take home some authentic souvenirs from Provence, choose from stalls that feature plant and flower scented soaps, colorful hand-woven baskets and tote bags, tablecloths, placemats and table cloths. cloth napkins with classic Provencal patterns, pottery and ceramics. The Lourmarin market is open every Friday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Restaurants and hotels

The Butter Rouche is a rustic restaurant that specializes in roasting meats on a fire pit.

For the best pizza in the village, Pizza Nonni bakes their pizzas in the authentic. wood-fired ovens for maximum flavor.

Bastide de Lourmarin hotel is a four-star hotel in an old Provencal house with 17 rooms and two suites. Room amenities include air conditioning, in-room coffeemakers, private terraces and, in some rooms, a whirlpool tub. There is also a heated outdoor pool and spa services by appointment.

Roussillon

High cliffs of a rich ocher color, contrasting with emerald green forests, are the main attraction of Roussillon. The village has a well marked and easy to walk path which has an old ocher quarry inside a forest. Local stores sell pots of brightly colored pigments for painting.

Stroll through the city to discover the 17th and 18th century buildings painted in ocher, and also visit the art galleries and craft shops that display works of artists and craftsmen who live in the area.

Roussillon has a small, well-stocked food and flea market with 30 stalls and is open every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

In a side of historical anecdotes, playwright and author Samuel Beckett takes refuge in Roussillon for The Second World War when he was in the Resistance. He also referred to Roussillon in his famous play, “Waiting for Godot. “

Restaurants and hotels

The Grape Cluster serves excellent Provencal-style cuisine and has an outdoor terrace with stunning views of the ocher cliffs.

For more casual cuisine with French pastries and dishes like quiches, goat cheese salads and croque monsieur, Café la Poste is on the main street.

The Mas de Roussillon is an old farm building restored as a four bedroom bed and breakfast with comfortably appointed bedrooms and contemporary bathrooms. There is a lovely garden with loungers and chairs and an outdoor swimming pool.

Lauris

Located at the top of a formidable mountain, Lauris offers a breathtaking view of the Luberon mountain range and Durance valley. As you stroll through the hilly village, you will discover charming houses with shutters painted in red, purple and periwinkle and festooned with ivy and vines and seasonal plants and flowers.

A French garden of an ancient chateau with rows of evenly planted plane trees and a pond is a serene place to relax and also to enjoy the view.

Just outside of Lauris is Silvacane Abbey, a 12th century Cistercian monastery open to the public with remarkable architecture in Gothic and Romanesque style. The abbey also serves as a cultural center which sponsors art exhibitions and concerts.

Restaurants and hotels

Margot’s Table is a smart combination of a home accessories store and a stylish restaurant. The restaurant serves traditional French and international cuisine with seasonal ingredients, such as duck confit, osso bucco, Moroccan lamb tagine with almonds and apricots and tarte Tatin.

The Domaine de Fontenille is a private complex on a wine estate comprising a five-star hotel, a spa and wellness center, two restaurants, a cellar and a vegetable patch and an herb garden which supplies the restaurants. Former noble manor of the 18th century, with only 19 rooms and two suites, Le Domaine de Fontenille pampers its guests in true French luxury. The Field of the Moon is haute cuisine, Michelin-starred restaurant, and the most informal The kitchen has an outdoor terrace shaded by rows of plane trees. The hotel also has an outdoor swimming pool and sauna.

Cucuron

A large basin fed by a spring bordered by imposing 200-year-old plane trees forms the town square, Place de l’Étang, is the culmination of Cucuron. Every Tuesday, the local food market brings together city dwellers and the last weekend of July, flea market at antique shops. The square is also home to many of the city’s best restaurants, cafes and grocery stores, including the best ice cream in the area, The Cooler.

Opposite the square is an ancient stone arch, which was originally the entry point to the village. If you keep going through the gate you will come across a myriad of medieval houses and structures, including the Notre-Dame de Beaulieu Church, the original town hall and the 13th century church. If you continue to climb the hills to the top, you will discover a superb aerial view of the village and the surrounding area.

Restaurants and hotels

The picturesque Hotel de l’Étang, painted on the outside in daffodil yellow with mint green shutters on the town square, has six rooms, some with terraces overlooking the basin and the square.

The hotel also has The little house, a Michelin-starred restaurant with a renowned chef Eric Sapet. The restaurant was popularized by Peter Mayle in his bestseller, “One year in Provence“, which also appeared in the film version, with Russell Crowe and Marion Cotillard.

The main stations closest to the above villages are either Avignon or Aix en Provence, both of which are about a 50 to 60 minute drive away. Avignon is three hours from TGV train of Paris and Aix en Provence is three hours and twenty minutes. Both stations have extensive on-site car rental services.

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This $ 5.77 million Tuscan-style villa in Los Angeles exudes old Hollywood charm – Robb Report https://artlini.net/this-5-77-million-tuscan-style-villa-in-los-angeles-exudes-old-hollywood-charm-robb-report/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 18:02:58 +0000 https://artlini.net/this-5-77-million-tuscan-style-villa-in-los-angeles-exudes-old-hollywood-charm-robb-report/

Horror film maestro, British director James Whale, produced some of his best fear festivals during his time living in this Mediterranean palace high in the Hollywood hills. Everything from the cult classic Frankenstein in 1931, at The invisible Man in 1933, at Bride of Frankenstein in 1935.

Whale had bought the house, named Villa Sophia, from Clement E. Smoot, the Olympic gold medalist golfer. Smoot commissioned the hilltop home, with its panoramic views of neighboring 4,200-acre Griffiths Park, from legendary LA architect Henry Harwood Hewitt.

Fast forward to the late 1990s, and successful options trader Constantine Vlahos – Tim to his friends – had spent nearly two years gazing at the iconic villa from his home in nearby Echo Park.

The terrace of Villa Sophia offers a breathtaking view of LA.

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

“I fantasized about the house before I even entered it. I have always been a fan of Italian architecture and loved the place. It was like a piece of Tuscany right here in LA, ”said Mr. Vlahos Robb Report.

When it hit the market in 2000, it grabbed it and paid $ 1.05 million, according to Zillow. “He was in terrible shape. No one really took care of it. It was just awful inside.

What he had was the location. Situated at the end of a cul-de-sac in the hills of the celebrity-rich Los Feliz enclave, the house offered a million-dollar view of Griffith Park and its iconic observatory to one side, and the downtown LA on the other.

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

After moving in, Mr. Vlahos, 58, spent two long years developing a grand plan to transform Villa Sophia. His biggest challenge? Excavating the steep hill to create a level area to install a swimming pool, expansive decks, and a separate 750 square foot guesthouse with a gorgeous gazebo above.

“We ended up having to build a 15-foot-deep retaining wall with casons that went down 30 feet to bedrock. And with no space to bring heavy equipment, everything had to be dug out by hand. It ended up being a $ 2 million wall.

For the nearly 3,000 square feet of terraces, Mr. Vlahos imported reclaimed terracotta tiles from Italy, France and Spain. That ornamental railing around the pool deck? It took two artisans over a year to hand mold it on site.

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

The swimming pool in the garden of Villa Sophia.

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

“The result is an extraordinary property in the most exceptional location, with true Old Hollywood pedigree,” says broker Rick Yohon, of Sotheby’s International Realty, who owns the coveted ad. “And, at $ 5.77 million in this overheated market, its price is attractive.”

If the house looks vaguely familiar, it may be because of Mr. Vlahos’ astute marketing to film and TV studios to use the villa as an Italian-style backdrop.

The latest episode of HBO Entourage in 2011 shows Jeremy Piven’s character Ari and his wife on the pool deck of their glamorous Italian villa overlooking the Mediterranean. Only it was filmed at Villa Sophia with the sea added digitally.

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

A room in Villa Sophia.

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

This film directed for television by Lindsay Lohan in 2012 Liz & Dick, profiling the love affair between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, also used the house as a setting. Then there was the episode of The bachelorette, another for Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, and photo shoots for Vogue, It, GQ and Victoria’s Secret.

In its current form, the four-story home spans 4,525 square feet and includes three bedrooms and two and a half baths in the main house, as well as a separate one-bed guest suite by the pool. .

The first floor of the main house has a connected living and dining room, each with patio doors leading out to huge terraces. The chef’s kitchen is made up of high-end professional-grade appliances, rustic stone sinks and arched doors.

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

Stairs lead up to the master bedroom level, with its elegant master suite with windows on three sides and two further bedrooms in a long hallway. Continuing the steps, you arrive in a comfortable office on the roof.

Perhaps the best “room” in the house is this outdoor loggia, with its antique chandeliers, rustic wooden beams and breathtaking views of downtown Los Angeles (see photo above).

“I will be sad to see it disappear,” says Vlahos. “I have lived here for 20 years and I have put my heart and soul into renovating it. But it’s time to let someone else enjoy it. I think I have another project in me.

Check out more photos of Villa Sophia below:

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty

The Villa Sophia in Los Angeles

Photo: Jo David / Charmaine David Photography / Sotheby’s International Realty


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